Pharmacy WorkPlace photo

Employer Resources

There are several options available to businesses and employers for exploring hiring a worker with a disability. Employers can choose what’s best for them and their company and find out how employees with disabilities can contribute to the bottom line.

Employers can include people with disabilities by:

Internships provide opportunities for on-the-job training to the benefit of both employers and job seekers: Companies explore the existing talent pool and strengthen their future workforce, while interns apply unique knowledge and skills to business challenges. 

Direct benefits to businesses employing interns with disabilities include:

  • Increased organizational diversity at a company
  • An effective employee recruitment and retention tool
  • Ability to screen potential employees prior to making a full-time commitment
  • Reduction of turnover and training costs
  • Improvement of a company’s bottom line by meeting labor demands
  • Increase in brand awareness by reinforcing an organization’s commitment to education and workforce development
  • Access to an energetic, enthusiastic and work-ready candidate pool with a fresh perspective
  • Ability for staff to share professional knowledge to enrich, encourage, and support future employees

Although interns are usually college students, they can also be high school students or post-graduate adults. Internships can last anywhere from two weeks to several months and can be paid or unpaid.

For more information about providing internship opportunities for workers with a disability, visit the Employer Toolkit.  For assistance hiring an intern with a disability, contact The Able Trust at 850.224.4493 or info@abletrust.org.

Mentoring is a personnel enhancement strategy wherein a current employee pairs with a new colleague or potential employee to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and skills.

Mentoring experiences provide job seekers with disabilities the opportunity to get a glimpse of a company’s work environment while helping them to gain and practice skills that are useful in professional settings and prepare for life in the workplace. Mentoring can offer not only academic and career guidance to mentees, but also can cultivate role models for leadership, interpersonal and problem-solving skills at a business. 

Through mentoring employees or job seekers with disabilities, employers benefit by gaining:

  • Increased organizational diversity at a company
  • An effective employee recruitment and retention tool
  • Creation of a welcoming and inclusive workplace culture
  • Transfer of organizational knowledge and promotion of professional development within a business
  • Increased preparedness for workforce turnover, especially in senior-level positions, and reduction thereof
  • Improved supervisory skills, productivity and satisfaction among your employees 

To offer a mentoring experience for a job seeker with a disability, contact The Able Trust at 850.224.4493 or info@abletrust.org.

One-on-one job shadowing provides a short-term opportunity for a job seeker with a disability to learn what it is like to be a part of a company’s workplace. A business professional is matched individually with a student or job seeker with a disability so that the employee can share information about a typical workday at the company and provide insight about how to prepare for a particular career field.

Direct benefits to businesses offering job shadowing experiences to students or job seekers with disabilities include:

  • A simple yet effective employee recruitment tool
  • Creation of a welcoming and inclusive workplace culture
  • Ability for staff to share professional knowledge to enrich, encourage, and support potential employees
  • Increased brand awareness via reinforcement of an organization's commitment to education and workforce development 

Job shadowing experiences usually last one work day or a half-day and can lead to internships or mentoring experiences.

To provide a job shadowing experience to a job seeker with a disability, contact The Able Trust at 850.224.4493 or info@abletrust.org.

Finding qualified and dependable employees is one of the greatest challenges a business leader may face. People with disabilities have the talents, skills and abilities that businesses need. They are dependable, enthusiastic and some of the most loyal employees an employer will find.

Effective outreach and recruitment strategies will ensure that a company’s workforce attracts qualified job seekers with disabilities. To build a pipeline of qualified applicants with disabilities, a business will need to develop relationships with recruitment sources. In Florida, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Workforce Florida and other organizations provide access to:

  • Pre-screened, qualified applicants
  • Technical assistance and advice on accommodations
  • On-site disability awareness training
  • Reimbursement for on-the-job training costs

By recruiting applicants with disabilities through a Service Provider, a company can secure access to talent that it otherwise may have overlooked while gaining assistance to effectively integrate job candidates with disabilities into the workplace.

To access recruitment services for hiring job seekers with disabilities, contact your a office of the Florida Division of Vocational Rehabilitation or Workforce Florida by visiting the Provider Directory.

Employers that want a diverse and inclusive customer and client base will need a similarly diverse and inclusive workforce to serve that base. Employing workers with disabilities is not charitable; it makes good business sense. 

Employing workers with disabilities can help a business to:

  • Leverage tax incentives, when applicable, to realize tax credits ranging from $2,400 to $5,000
  • Reduce turnover costs with a talent pool that tends to stay with an employer longer
  • Create more efficient work processes by implementing accommodations for workers with disabilities that result in overall increases in productivity
  • Improve company-wide morale, goodwill and community involvement
  • Receive positive feedback from customers who see themselves reflected in the workforce
  • Realize goals relating to diversity and inclusion and explore the advantages of such a workforce

In Florida, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and Workforce Florida provide a variety of comprehensive services to employers in order to help with the recruitment, hiring and retention of qualified workers with disabilities. Service Providers can help a company maximize the bottom line — saving time and money while showing a return on investment — through no-cost job placement, on-the-job training and ongoing support.

For assistance in hiring job seekers with disabilities, contact your a office of the Florida Division of Vocational Rehabilitation or Workforce Florida by visiting the Provider Directory.

Fostering an environment where workers with disabilities feel valued and respected is critical to successful recruitment and retention. Workplace inclusion is a strategy and product of company-wide policies, attitudes and practices, which together influence both employee and customer perceptions of the business.

A basic understanding of disability etiquette can help make employees feel more comfortable when interacting with coworkers and supervisors with disabilities. Good disability etiquette can also expand business opportunities and help organizations serve customers more effectively.

The Able Trust and its partners can offer training to employers on topics related to the recruitment, hiring and retention of people with disabilities, as well as disability sensitivity training for current company executives and employees.

To host a disability employment expert as a speaker, contact The Able Trust at 850.224.4493 or info@abletrust.org.